How to book an Interpreter….

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Taking for granted that everyone knows how to book a BSL / English interpreter is easily done. I work every day with those that book and work with interpreters (both hearing and deaf) so I risk the assumption that, of course, EVERYONE knows how to book one (or two, or however many you need). However, talking to those that do not work in the field of interpreting or connected to it in any way, this reminds me that it could be an unfamiliar and possibly, quite a daunting task. For those of you that often book interpreters then have a look below to see if there is anything that could make the process easier….

Whichever your preferred method of contact there is some essential information which the interpreter will need to know initially before a booking can be finalised….the date and time. This is important so that the interpreter can check their diary and get back to you ASAP. Not certain of the date and time? No problem, the important thing is that both you and the interpreter are flexible enough to determine a time and date that suits both of you. An interpreter may be able to hold a date that you have in mind with the agreement that you will get back to them with more finalised information.

So, if the time and date has been discussed, the interpreter will need to know the expected length of the booking. Working from English to BSL or BSL to English is a tiring task and usually after about 45 minutes of non-stop interpreting my brain is frazzled and I need a short break! If the length of the booking is longer than 45 minutes best practice dictates booking two interpreters. This means that they can both co-work together. Usually one interpreter will decide to work 15 to 20 minutes on their own and then swap with their co-worker and vice versa throughout the length of the assignment. There can be times when one interpreter could work solo for the entire day, but they would need lots of breaks to avoid interpreting overload! These breaks are not only for the interpreter to recharge but also to ensure the quality of interpreting is consistent. For an interpreter to say that they don’t need breaks means that the quality of either their English or BSL being produced will be poor. Thus, one of the main aims of having an interpreter, i.e. that communication is clear and accurate between both the hearing and deaf client(s), would not be achieved.

Prep would be grand, thanks. Sometimes, with a short booking, it may not be possible to provide prep (e.g. information that can help the interpreter have a better understanding or can research about the assignment, such as powerpoint slides, meeting minutes, etc). It is worth considering that, what might be pointless to you could be meaningful to the interpreter. For example, I interpret a lot of religious services and on many occasions the person preaching delivers their sermon ad-lib (that’s their style, fair enough!). However, when I ask them about their ‘scribbled notes’ as they like to call them, this is really handy because I then know the aim of their message/sermon and what they want their ‘take home message’ to be for those listening. If I know this then I can keep this in mind when interpreting. I can also research more around the topic and practice how I would interpret phrases and signs. Also, having this prep in advance is vital. Most of those who knew me when I was studying at Cardiff or when doing my Diploma at UCLAN knew that my brain sort of switched itself off after about 10.00pm, I was not one of those people that could work ‘through the night’ as some of my peers would say (you’ll be pleased to know I am an early-bird). That means, receiving prep late at night before the booking isn’t always helpful to me.  

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Please provide the address of where you would like the interpreter to go. Preferably the full address, but the name of the venue and the postcode is always important. Hopefully, most interpreters will not make the same mistake I have done in the past which is to rely solely on their satnav to direct them where to go. I now know to plan the route on google maps or on an equivalent tool. Living in Devon is great, but the satnav can get quite confused.

It is always good to know before you make a booking that of who will pay. There is a service provided by the government called Access to Work (A2W). This could help with funding to pay for an interpreter. The service is there for anyone whose health or disability affects the way they do their job. Have a look at this factsheet for more information about A2W: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/307036/employer-guide-atw-dwpf03a.pdf

You are allowed to change your mind – this can happen, events, appointments, meetings (whatever you needed your interpreter for) can get cancelled. If you cancel me before 14 days of the booking then no charge is incurred whatsoever. Therefore, if you know you need to make a cancellation, best to do it ASAP.

Remember: By making contact with me does not mean you are obliged to book me as an interpreter. If you just want to know more information, discuss costs or have some questions, that isn’t a problem – always happy to help :).

So now you know what to do. If you want to make a booking for a BSL Interpreter or have some more questions then please do get in contact either by phone: 07791442625; Email: chall86@outlook.com or leave a reply here on my website; and, you can always contact me via twitter @CHHInterpreting

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